New indictment comes as a tactical move in Chris Collins case for avoiding delays in the trial

New indictment comes as a tactical move in Chris Collins case for avoiding delays in the trial

When the federal prosecutors presented new charges this week against Rep. Chris Collins, it was the allegations that they had left out of the indictment that explained the real story.

Eager to avoid any more delays in the case of insider trading, the prosecutors removed any references to behavior which might be considered as privileged in the clause of speech and debate of the Constitution.

The goal of the government was to eliminate part of the legal defense of Collins and make it complicated for him to delay the trial which was now set for 3rd February of next year.

Baary N. Covert, the defense attorney said that this was only a clever Texas two-step. He said that it did not indicate the weakness of the government; it was just a technical move for ensuring that there was no delay in the trial.

Collins made it very clear he had full intentions to rely on the speech and debate clause as his defense, which was a tactic which could make it possible to lengthen the hearings and further elongate the appeal.

The actions of the government amounted to a trimming of the indictment and showed that it must not delay the trial at all.

The new indictment came about exactly one year after the previous indictment had and charged Collins; Cameron Collins, his son; and his prospective father-in law, Stephen Zarsky; for participating in a scheme of and insider stock trading that involved Innate Immunotherapeutics, an Australian biotech company.

All three men have been charged with conspiracy, fraud as well as lying to the federal authorities. However, Collins and the other defendants are maintaining their innocence.